Projects

NEW UPDATE 3:53 PM June-1-13

Into the Mystic Lands (stands at): 46,321 words, 184.16 pages!!!

Into the Mystic Lands: The Eastern Sea Revolt (stands at) --6,851 words, 27.4 pages!!!

The Adventures of Walrus Island: Editing, 70,211 words, 146 pages.



Friday, July 30, 2010

Blog Button

I have seen quite a few people making buttons for their blogs, so I , like most of them, also became interested in it. I posted instructions below as to how to make one (click here to go to the original site).

In Blogger under Layout, choose to add a gadget. Choose HTML/Javascript. In the title box, type something like "Get My Button". Now simply copy and paste the code below into the text box. Replace the colored information with your blog's information and your button's web address (for more information on how to get a web address for your button click here). Save and position the button where you want it. Save your changes and view your blog.

In Blogger under Layout, choose to add a gadget. Choose HTML/Javascript. In the title box, type something like "Get My Button". Now simply copy and paste the code below into the text box. Replace the colored information with your blog's information and your button's web address (for more information on how to get a web address for your button click here). Save and position the button where you want it. Save your changes and view your blog.



http://YOUR WEB ADDRESS/" target="_blank" title="BLOG TITLE"><span style=BLOG TITLE" src="http://IMAGE WEB ADDRESS"/>








Make sure that there is only one http:// before your web address and before the image web address. If you copy and paste you may need to delete an extra http:// in order for the code to work

If you want to design your own image you can do it at Photoshop.com then grab the link and add it into the HTML coding. And there you go!
~Son of the King~ 

Monday, July 26, 2010

Rora

Rora is another fabulous book that I have been reading lately. Of course it is a history based book that has been twisted to make a story.
The Author, James Byron Huggins based the true story around  the historic stand of the Waldenses in 1655, Rora is a spellbinding tale of a legendary hero, of international intrigue and subterfuge, of cloak-and-dagger tactics, and a faith that refused to die.

Although mostly focusing on the history of the event (which can become extremely boring after a while) excitement will show it's self in every battle for religious freedom.

~Son of the King~ 

The Shack

Almost a year ago, I was introduced to the author of the Shack (William P Young). The book is amazing and extremely touching for those in every condition. I you have never read the book then I will give you a brief introduction to it.

The Shack is a book that seeks to provide answers     
to the always timely question “Where is God in a
world so filled with unspeakable pain?”. It is a
tale that revolves around Mack (Mackenzie) Philips.
Four years before the story begins, Mack’s young
daughter, Missy, was abducted during a family vacation.
Though her body was never found, the police did find
evidence in an abandoned shack to prove that she had
been brutally murdered by a notorious serial killer who
preyed on young girls. As the story begins, Mack, who
has been living in the shadow of his Great Sadness,
receives a note from God (known in this story as Papa).
Papa invites Mack to return to this shack for a time
together. Though uncertain of what to expect, Mack
visits the scene of the crime and there experiences a
weekend-long encounter with God, or, more properly,
with the Godhead.
Each of the members of the Trinity is present and
each appears in bodily form. Papa, whose actual name
is Elousia (which is Greek for tenderness) appears in
the form of a large, matronly African-American woman
(though near the book’s end, because Mack requires a
father figure, she turns into a pony-tailed, grey-haired
man). Jesus is a young to middle-aged man of Middle-
Eastern descent while the Holy Spirit is played by
Sarayu (Sanskrit for air or wind), a small, delicate and
eclectic woman of Asian descent. Mack also meets for a
time with Sophia, who, like Lady Wisdom in Proverbs, is
the personification of God’s wisdom.
The reader learns that Mack has been given this
opportunity to meet with God so he could learn to deal
with his Great Sadness--the overwhelming pain and
anger resulting from the death of his daughter. There is
very little action in The Shack and the bulk of the book
is dialog. The majority of the dialog occurs as the
members of the Trinity communicate with Mack, though
occasionally the author
offers glimpses into their
unique relationships with
one another.
As the weekend
progresses Mack
participates in lengthy and discussions with
each member of the Trinity.
Topics range from the cross to the Trinity and from
forgiveness to free will. He finds his understanding of
God and his relationship with God radically and
irrevocably altered. His faith is dismantled piece by
piece and then put back together. As we might expect,
he leaves the cabin a changed man.

And that is all I can tell you about it. If you want to buy the book then you can find it on eBay, Amazon, or in you own Christian book store. 

~Son of the King~ 

PhotoShop.com

After living through another hectic day I finally found some time to sit down at my computer and enjoy life. I found (on another random hunt on the Web) a fantastic photo editing workshop where all the fancy pictures that you have on your camera can be done up into your dream picture. Here is an example of one of my fine pieces of art. 


If you want to go to this site then just enter here. It is completely free and you only have to go through a quick sign up to get in. 

~Son of the King~ 

Saturday, July 24, 2010

History behind poetry

While browsing the web on one of my random hunts I stumbled across an extremely interesting site that gave a brief history of poetry. I took from the site (What I believed to be the most important) and put them below for you to enjoy. (Click here to visit the site)
 
Poetry as an art form predates literacy. Some of the earliest poetry is believed to have been orally recited or sung. Following the development of writing, poetry has since developed into increasingly structured forms, though much poetry since the late 20th century has moved away from traditional forms towards the more vaguely defined free verse and prose poem formats.
Poetry was employed as a way of remembering oral history, story (epic poetry), genealogy, and law. Poetry is often closely related to musical traditions, and much of it can be attributed to religious movements. Many of the poems surviving from the ancient world are a form of recorded cultural information about the people of the past, and their poems are prayers or stories about religious subject matter, histories about their politics and wars, and the important organizing myths of their societies.
The oldest surviving poem is the Epic of Gilgamesh, from the 4th millennium BC in Sumer (in Iraq/Mesopotamia), which was written in cuneiform script on clay tablets and, later, papyrus. The Epic of Gilgamesh is based on the historical king Gilgamesh. The oldest love poem, found on a clay tablet now known as Istanbul #2461, was also a Sumerian poem. It was recited by a bride of the Sumerian king Shu-Sin, who ruled from 2037–2029 BC. The oldest epic poetry besides the Epic of Gilgamesh are the Greek epics Iliad and Odyssey and the Indian Sanskrit epics Ramayana and Mahabharata. The longest epic poems ever written were the Mahabharata and the Tibetan Epic of King Gesar.

Enjoy!